‘Patient and Particular in Provenance’

CONVERSATION

According to the Australian Financial Review, our Slow Luxury ‘phenomenon’ is part of a move towards transparency, meaning and ethics in today’s consumer behaviour.

The article ‘Patient and Particular in Provenance’ (by Hannah Tattersall) explains all…

“In a scene from hipster comedy Portlandia, two characters order chicken from a local restaurant, but not before questioning where the chicken came from, what sort of life it led and what it ate before it was killed. They learn that “Colin” was woodland-raised and fed a diet of sheep’s milk, soy and hazelnuts.

The scene pokes fun at the slow food movement – a development that in recent years has become more a norm than a trend. Today, restaurants on every street corner spruik farm-to-table ideals; at the very least they offer artisanal sourdough with organically whipped butter.

Slow fashion, in particular slow luxury, is based on much the same principles. It follows the idea that consumers aren’t interested in simply buying a leather bag any more: they want to know which cow was killed to make it, how that cow was treated when alive and whether it ate organic grass. They’re also willing to wait months and sometimes years for a better-quality, more exclusive item, giving rise to the belief that the longer you wait for something the more you appreciate it once it’s yours. It’s not a new idea. Savile Row tailors and companies with British royal warrants built businesses on the values of supplying the best-quality products through the most sustainable means.

Savile Row master tailor Steven Hitchcock says he often makes garments for customers willing to wait years for their creation. “A client fell in love with a cloth, then when I went to order it from the mill it was out of stock and they had to reproduce it. The procedure of weaving the cloth was about five months. So by the time I managed to cut it and fit it to the customer in New York, it amassed to nearly two years.” He says the customer was enamoured. “If someone is looking for something unique and has a certain image they want, then the wait is worth it.”

Britt Allanson Bivens, a trend forecaster and lecturer at The New School in New York agrees. “What the customer is getting is complete and utter exclusivity, and they’re part of the design process – that’s desirable,” she says . “We have had the whole, ‘fast fashion is evil’ pushed down our throats now and there’s definitely a much higher awareness than there ever was about the price to pay for fast fashion. Second, luxury companies – because they wanted to justify the price of their products – started putting all those marketing videos out there detailing things such as the 51 steps involved in making a Chanel 2.5 bag.”

360-degree consideration in a product

American Jade Dressler and Scottish-born Fiona Fraser co-founded Slow Luxury two years ago, to teach brands and consumers about ethical manufacturing and alert them to where their products are originating. “It’s really about all the things that Slow Food is similarly about – taking care of community, making sure people’s families are taken care of, so that it’s a ­360-degree consideration in making a product,” Dressler says.

Prior to forming Slow Luxury, Fraser had developed her own bag label, Fraser Balgowan. Deer were often killed for their prized venison but their hide went to waste – so she found a way to put it to use. Customers interested in the bags could visit the estate in Inverness-shire, where the deer were raised and killed by a single deer hunter. Buyers from Europe, the US, Canada, Australia, the Middle East and Russia travelled to Scotland to enjoy a highland experience with tailored local food and whisky – and place an order for a £400 to £1700 ($700 to $3000) bag. Fraser says it was important to draw attention not only to the provenance of the bag but the history and traditions of the families of the Scottish highlands. (For personal reasons she is no longer able to produce the bags but is working on a new project.)

Luxury brands are also doing their part. Louis Vuitton allows customers to order custom-made pieces including handbags and shoes in exotic leathers such as alligator, ostrich or python that can take 12 to 18 months to produce. The main reason for the wait is that these skins are hard to come by. To ensure a steady flow of sustainably produced, untarnished leather, LVMH last year bought an Australian crocodile farm for $US2.5 million ($2.7 million). Competitor Kering followed suit, acquiring a majority stake in French tannery France Coco, which specialises in sourcing and processing crocodile skins. Last year one brand in its stable, Gucci, released new eco and ethical versions of its famous Jackie, Hobo and Tote bags. The bag now comes with a “passport” detailing “the precise history” of the cow it was made from, from birth to the final product.

Others have the long wait without guarantee of best-practice. A Hermès International Birkin bag, a staple of the wealthy, sells for about $10,000 in leather; a crocodile version could set you back $50,000 – with a five-year wait. Dressler says they are not as transparent as they should be about the materials used. “We talk so much about sustainable cloth and no one wants to wear fur, but there is conversation around that. There’s no conversation around leather,” she says.

“An amazing Hermès bag is made of factory-farmed leather. We’re having this consciousness around our food, but it’s not necessarily extending full-fledged into what we put on our bodies – what we wear, and the impact on the environment, whether it’s factory-farmed animals or whatnot. Of course Hermès is going to pick a really high-end leather, but that animal suffered just the same.”

She believes luxury consumers are far more educated than they used to be and that will drive a change. “It’s not a niche discussion any more. I know couture designers may not be all open to considering it, but I think within the next five years, it’s going to happen.”

Certainly, as with the slow food movement, the idea of slow fashion is starting to enter the mainstream. Even fast fashion retailer H&M has a Conscious Collection of clothing made from organic cotton, Tencel and recycled polyester – God forbid that the consumer feel shame at buying a $5 factory-made maxi dress.

Dressler says “there’s a growing number of people who want that connection with their purchase and it’s absolutely about some kind of emotional connection with a product that means something to them”.

 Read the original article: ‘Patient and Particular in Provenance’ (by Hannah Tattersall)

 

13 windows into the Iona Crawford Slow Luxury Story…

CONVERSATION

Heads up! Basically this is not your typical press release.
INSTEAD…

We invite you to live Slow Luxury style, take time, click on each image and immerse yourself in this co*lab story of Beauty and The Beasts.


You know it, there’s no fighting it…
the best things things in life do take time.

Here are your clickable images:

Beauty and the Beasts      The Designer      The Collection

The Film      The Launch      The Lace

The Actress      The Gossip Girl and the Footballer     

The Atelier       The Co*Lab       The Slow Luxury

THE STORY: Once Upon a Fine Spring Day, in NYC’s Bryant Park, two 20-foot high maquettes of THE KELPIES, the large steely BEASTS, 100-ft high sculptures arising from the land in Scotland, met 13 silky, ethereal NYC damsel BEAUTIES dressed in timeless silks in Slow Luxury’s IONA CRAWFORD BEAUTY AND THE BEASTS CAPSULE COLLECTION LAUNCH

Collection Look Book is Here.

For Immediate Release: 

This Spring, for the U.S. portion of the global introduction of fashion designer Iona Crawford, a multi-faceted international collaboration of artists in art, film, music, live performance and even bespoke lace-making, touched down in New York City’s Bryant Park.  The launch of Crawford’s Beauty and The Beasts Capsule Collection, was first inspired by Andy Scott’s Kelpies, the 100-ft silver metal horse sculptures newly arising from the land at The Helix at the Forth & Clyde canal at Falkirk, Scotland.  Beginning with a visit to her friend Andy’s studio as the massive sculptures were just emerging, the chain of inspiration became an art collaboration spanning continents.

Slow Luxury, a lifestyle marketing agency based in NYC and the UK, working with clients that define sustainable luxury, envisioned the full scope of Iona Crawford’s Collection introduction. The collaborative project made its appearance in New York, with a public performance and notable tastemakers wearing the Collection for red carpets, event appearances and magazine feature story editorials. The week culminated in the Bryant Park performance, where models ceremoniously gifted the lunchtime crowd with small ribbon-tied bundles of silk containing poetry, chocolate and a #KelpiesBeauty hashtag. Set to live music, the performance ran alongside the smaller 20-foot maquettes of The Kelpies, on view during Scotland Week in New York.

The Collection also won favor for notable red carpet appearances and media features during April from VH1’s The Gossip Table‘s host, Delaina Dixon, who wore a black cashmere and leather dress to a film premiere with Mario “Cashmere” Maningham of the NY Giants; singer-songwriter Jess Domain, who began her career as an Aretha Franklin back-up singer, wore the collection for her upcoming feature story in Hour Detroit magazine, and actress Gemma Forbes wore the Collection’s signature long tunic in Madras lace for a gala dinner at The Metropolitan Club.

Based in Glasgow, home of the first retail Iona Crawford Atelier, opening 2014, Iona Crawford designs custom, limited-edition series women’s clothing and home accessories in rich and tonal fabrics of Scottish origin including cashmere, merino wool and leather, as well as silks printed with her paintings. The Beauty and The Beasts Capsule Collection is designed to be worn in all seasons.

The Collection contains references to saddlery through cut and structure dictating silhouette, while bespoke damask lace, featuring a figurative representation of the Kelpies in large scale, pays reference to the metallic geometry of the sculptures themselves.

Intended as a seasonless collection of artful pieces in numbered and signed editions of 1000 pieces each, curated, exclusive pieces of the Collection are sold on the Slow Luxury site, www.slow-luxury.com. and Iona Crawford’s site offers the full Collection.  www.ionacrawford.com

“The industrial, steely strength of the Kelpies horses came alive within their towering, angular NYC surrounds. I love the city’s intense juxtapositions, contrasting layers and rich architectural diversity. The city’s creativity, like beautiful silk contrasted against a backdrop of hard-core metal, dynamically enhances the inspiration behind the collection,” says Crawford.

Crawford’s launch collaboration with Slow Luxury built upon Slow Luxury’s work creating brand experiences which seek to establish ” A New Standard for Sustainable Luxury.”  Iona Crawford’s sustainable luxury practices, fabrics, and designs align with Slow Luxury’s “The Ten Commitments”  and mission to “design goods and experiences, where the highest design and quality meet excellent social, economic and environmental attainments.” www.slow-luxury.com

 

“Beauty and The Beasts is designed to be a rich unfolding and sharing of the artists’ experience,” notes Jade Dressler, co-founder of Slow Luxury.

“The collaborative story offers multiple entry points – sculptures on the land, art, films, music, performances, e-commerce, in-depth stories on custom fabrics and even T-shirts!,” adds co-founder Fiona Fraser.

 

Additional artist collaborations on the Beauty and The Beasts project include a film “Climb” by the BAFTA-winning MP Productions, featuring the song “Kids” as sung by Hannah Read; exclusive commissioned Kelpies madras lace by MYB Textiles; Bryant Park performance production by re:artiste and Shavonce Armstrong; photography by Alvaro Montagna of Small Earth Group; shoes from Capezio; chocolates from The Highland Chocolatier; fragrance from AromaM; hair by Smith-Grieve and makeup from Don Rokicki.

For this collaboration, ten percent of the sale price of the Iona Crawford ‘Brodie’ pillow, available in the Slow Luxury Co*Lab shop will be donated to the International Fund for Animal Welfare. Donations of fabric and ribbons from the Bryant Park performance will be made to Materials for the Arts, ‘New York’s premier reuse center, providing a way for companies and individuals to donated un-used intact supplies to thousands of non-profit organizations with arts programming and public schools.’

@ionacrawfordart       #KelpiesBeauty        @slowluxury

For appointments, information and images please contact:

Jade Dressler, 917.991.8140, jade@jadedressler.com

bbpost-launch

Slow Luxury presents: Iona Crawford ‘Beauty and the Beasts’ Capsule Collection

ART, CONVERSATION, FASHION

Once upon a time….urban workhorses in Scotland inspired sculptor Andy Scott to tap into the Kelpie’s story of transformation, which in turn …inspired artist and designer Iona Crawford’s silk sequences for her exquisite, bespoke and ready to order womenswear, and diffusion scarves, pillows, and T-shirts…which inspired a connection with Hannah Read’s music…leading to the performance in Bryant Park and the exclusive Capsule Collection on Slow Luxury.

Launching Tuesday, April 8, 2014, a selection of exclusive items from the Collection were available for a limited time on the new Slow Luxury online pop up shop, with the main Collection available from the Iona Crawford online store.

Go to ‘Happening Now’ to read exclusive interviews, images, films, poetry, the T-shirt…and the silk pocket squares and other steely, silky surprises!

SLOW LUXURY presents

IONA CRAWFORD ‘BEAUTY AND THE BEASTS’ CAPSULE COLLECTION

INTERACTIVE PERFORMANCE in BRYANT PARK, NEW YORK on
Tuesday, April 8th 2014 at 12.55pm

This Spring, THE KELPIES, 20 ft. massive silver steely horse heads, sit powerfully in the middle of New York City, in Bryant Park. Maquettes of the famed 100 ft. high sculptures in Scotland, sculpted by Andy Scott, these beasts meet silky, ethereal Scottish damsels, bearing gifts of Spring in the IONA CRAWFORD BEAUTY AND THE BEASTS CAPSULE COLLECTION LAUNCH…all during lunchtime on April 8th at 12.55pm.

An interactive performance will include live music from Scottish singer songwriter, HANNAH READ.

Launching Friday, April 8th, a selection of exclusive items from the Collection will be available on the new Slow Luxury online pop up shop, with the main Collection available from the Iona Crawford online store.

Follow us for updates:

 @slowluxury @ionacrawfordart #kelpiesbeauty

This event is produced by Slow Luxury with support from:

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SEG Logo

Donations of fabric and ribbons from the performance will be made to Materials for the Arts, ‘New York’s premier reuse center, providing a way for companies and individuals to donated un-needed supplies to thousands of non-profit organizations with arts programming and public schools.’

mfta-logo-sm

The Big Interview: Fiona Fraser, Slow Luxury Co-Founder

CONVERSATION, DESIGN, FASHION, MANUFACTURE, PEOPLE

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Anthony Akilade of the Herald Scotland meets Slow Luxury Co-founder, Fiona Fraser, as part of the Scottish Enterprise ‘Knowledge for Growth’ series…

Bling. A flash in the eye. You wanted it. You bought it. It was fast, often noisy. There may have been quality but it wasn’t essential. What mattered was that it stood out, that it shouted.

“That was then,” says brand development specialist Fiona Fraser, the world of high-end luxury is turning and buyers are now looking for a bit more substance in their purchases.

The trend is showing up in many different sectors. We have slow food where consumers take a deeper interest in where food comes from, how it is cooked and indeed how it is eaten. We also have slow travel, where the journey is as much a focus as the destination. In architecture, we have slow health with places such as Maggie’s Centres. Now we have slow luxury.

“The slow aspect recognises that the face of luxury has changed. Luxury consumers are far more educated today. They are really looking for meaning, value and connection in what they purchase. Their interest is in sustainability, they are interested in quality, heritage and in provenance. They are looking for products with a soul,” says Fraser who, along with co-founder Jade Dressler, has now established Slow Luxury.

Fraser and her New York-based business partner have both individually designed and developed luxury brands of their own. These have sold internationally to the top luxury retailers and it is this experience that informs Slow Luxury’s brand development work.

Luxury leaders such as Saks Fifth Avenue, Henri Bendel and Joyce in Hong Kong sold accessories Jade Dressler designed and she developed runway and stage pieces for Oscar de la Renta, Bill Blass and celebrities such as Cher.

“We’re not just saying let’s look at your marketing. We’re actually able to use our experience throughout the whole process to develop brands,” Fraser says.

“It all started when we worked with Scottish Enterprise’s textiles team to bring together a showcase roundtable conversation on the idea of slow luxury.

“We invited a number of non-competing Scottish brands, such Johnstons of Elgin and Hamilton & Inches, to come and take part so they had an opportunity to connect with American destination and events planners and tastemakers. These people included a planner who does the decorations for the White House in America, and writers for the New York Times, Forbes, About.com, Huffington Post and Vanity Fair. These were people with a lot of influence in the market either directly with the consumer or with buyers for high-end retailers,” says Fraser.

Fiona Fraser’s previous business, Fraser Balgowan, designed and developed bags and accessories that were made with sustainably-sourced red deer hides and sporting tweeds for the top end of the market.

“Within the first year of business we were selling to Saks 5th Avenue in New York and we were in The Wall Street Journal and Forbes magazine. It was the depth of storytelling that really connected with the people we were marketing to. Every bag had a story. That story connected people to those who worked on the land, worked on the estates, it related to shepherding, weaving, deerstalking and to the history of the communities in the Highlands.”

Fraser took this thirst for detail a step further and invited tastemakers from the US to Scotland. These high-end fashionistas were treated to a full tweed and heather deerstalking adventure so they could understand the way of life. So successful was this Slow Luxury immersive sourcing event that they are now offered by the company as a key brand development service.

“It’s about touching on something very personal, dipping into the richness of the craftspeople and the components of the products. In Scotland we are well positioned to highlight our history of manufacturing, our years of excellence and to tell a really great story,” she says.

But for Fraser too many of Scotland’s manufacturers are failing to truly connect with potential markets and customers.

“Technology obviously gives us much more of an even playing field than we had before. We don’t need to spend £10 million on a marketing campaign in the way we would have had to five or ten years ago,” Fraser says.

“If we are really going to work across the digital opportunities which provide us with other routes to market, we really have to improve on the way we tell our stories. It’s absolutely not good enough to say here’s our lovely scarf and it’s made with the best materials and it’s Made in Scotland. There needs to be more depth to the storytelling.”

Fraser does praise Scottish producers for being able to sell into the wholesale market however she sees a downside to this success.

“When all we do is sell to wholesalers we don’t have direct contact with the end customer so we don’t know what they are connecting with. We are not getting the intelligence back that helps us innovate and create new products,” Fraser says.

“The ‘cash rich and time poor’ luxury consumer is increasingly looking for curated product, it’s that idea of connection and personal engagement. That means the consumer is often interested in the lifestyle. They want to know what is the Scottish lifestyle.”

Learning these lessons from their own forays into high-end retailing has enabled Slow Luxury to reach out to other sectors of the luxury market and the company now is in discussions to consult and develop product with top-end Scottish retailers in apparel, interiors, accessories, food and drink, and experiential travel.

The company’s online brand development strategy focuses on using technology to strengthen social engagement by providing rich personalised content to create a virtual cycle.

“You build your audience and you build your conversation, that then drives traffic, which in turn drives sales and influences the media and buyers,” Fraser says.

In all this Fraser has high praise for the assistance she gained from Scottish Enterprise and the Global Scot Network.

“Stewart Roxburgh and the textiles team really connected with what we were doing. He’s been a fantastic mentor and helped with the initial introduction to Saks. The Global Scot Network too, both in the UK and the US, were a tremendous help. The advice I got from them was advice I couldn’t get from the agencies,” Fraser says.

“The irony of the Slow Luxury story is just how fast the journey has been,” Fraser adds.

Read the full interview in the Herald Scotland here

GREAT SCOTS: Scotland’s Slow Luxury Culture

CONVERSATION, DESIGN, FASHION, LAND, MANUFACTURE, PEOPLE

A Story About Luxury by Fiona Fraser

We Scots we don’t tell stories or shout out about our excellence, our luxury. While our invention, creativity and influence is felt throughout the world, most are unaware that the story of the luxury products we associate with Paris, London or Milan, actually originate from this wild and poetic place I call home, Scotland.

chanel

Tilda Swinton for Chanel

From a Chanel dress to a rare whisky; from a cashmere blanket to a $5000 designer suit, more often than not, while a label bears a famous name, the material inspiration and invention originates in Scotland.  Besides luxury fabrics and materials, we’ve created other inventions that have influenced the world.  Many began as the luxuries of their time, now necessities of today, such as the refrigerator, tires, steam engine, penicillin, colour photography, Peter Pan, Sherlock Holmes, golf, the telephone and television.

The-Balvenie-whisk_2201558b

The Balvenie

In Scotland, our ‘material culture’, the relationship between people, land and product inventions, is the story we have to tell. Aside from our great ‘social’ gifts to the world such as whisky, tartan and travel destinations, we have, however, failed to fully develop recognition for our other aspirational products, wholly owning our luxury brand identities that relate to Scotland’s materials, from pure sea salt to luxurious textiles.

Hebridean Sea Salt

Hebridean Sea Salt

Our heritage is based on hundreds of years of imaginative, ethical, sustainable production of material goods, (what we call Slow Luxury) and this is exactly what makes our products so desirable. Now is the time for these products, and their connection to people, land and time, to become the stories we tell globally. Now is the time for imaginative storytelling, for ‘imagination is the foundation of everything that is uniquely and distinctively human’ (The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything; Sir Ken Robinson with Lou Aronica) – and human interest, connection and relationships are what we know now drives the luxury desires of the contemporary consumer. The truth of the materials and production is the reward for the story.

Johnstons of Elgin2

Fabric from Johnstons of Elgin

Integral to this new idea of storytelling is Slow Luxury, not a fantasy nor a rigid and imposing ‘walk the talk,’ marketing “story”, rather an aspirational belief, an invitation for conversation, and an authentic way of blending lifestyle, community and commerce that has some greater depth of truth, transparency and meaning. 

For business, this framework must deliver returns but dare we anticipate that those returns might include benefits to the wider bottom line in addition to short term, hard cash?

For me, as the designer of a luxury collection, the benefits of this new adventure include becoming far more connected with my passions in life and questioning how I can contribute towards the sustainability of the economy, particularly in Scotland’s most fragile communities. I often ask this question of my clients and friends in luxury; ‘What might inviting dialogue and conversation focused on the stories around your brand actually realise for you personally and professionally; for your business, for your community, for your culture?’ ‘What is the market opportunity for us in using our vulnerability to ‘dare greatly’, to see the next adventure, given our knowledge of the thirst for connection with Scotland worldwide?’

We have lived through boom and bust times, particularly in terms of the manufacture of textiles.  We faced the near death of the industry and its negative impact on many communities, but we are re-inventing our offering as niche, as something of special, global value.  There is real vulnerability in this experience and we can use this to unlock our creativity.

Tweed Shop at Kyle of Lochalsh, Scotland

Tweed Shop at Kyle of Lochalsh, Scotland

What makes for this poor visibility or recognition for true Scottish luxury brands in the marketplace? Many of the best known Scottish (luxury) companies produce private label garments for other global brands such as Louis Vuitton and Burberry, sell through third party wholesalers, or in cases such as Pringle, our companies have been bought by international concerns who have expertly traded on ‘Scottishness’ and heritage, while moving much of the management and production out of the country.

Looking to the high street, Brooks Brothers and Paul Stewart shop windows in New York this very week are all ‘Highland’, featuring Scottish fabrics made by Scottish manufacturers, with little trace of a Scottish brand name to be seen.  In fact, Brooks Brothers has ‘Highland Heritage’ as its lead fashion trend for this season online, and the first edition of the Brooks Brothers magazine, published this week, features an extended editorial piece about Scotland with rich Scottish imagery and style sensibility.

This position is underpinned by the current Financial Times ‘How to Spend It’ edition, which speaks to technical innovation and the unrivalled quality of Scottish textiles, citing a who’s who of designers and luxury brands sourcing from Scotland, but with only passing reference to Scottish labels such as Begg & Co, who have invested in brand development in order to create visibility as a stand-alone proposition.  However, expert in the business of knowing how to ‘hook’ the audience, the FT article begins with a story; a story of Johnstons of Elgin, its film set-like archive and a royal connection.  Imagine if we were the ones telling this story?  Why encourage others to take ownership of our heritage, style, craftsmanship and luxury?

This invisibility, lack of individual brand identity and an inability to compete with large, international marketing budgets, goes some way to explain why Scotland’s luxury brands in fashion and interiors aren’t among the world’s best known names in luxury.  All the pride of manufacture and provenance, combined with our culture, inexperience, and less than bolshy approach to marketing, somehow precludes us from telling the world about our innovation and creativity, about our stories.  We collectively fail to envisage how our voice might be heard.  However, with social media and a plethora of online channels at our disposal, we do now have the opportunity to compete in a very cost effective way.

Style, Travel and Luxury on the Royal Scotsman

Style, Travel and Luxury on the Royal Scotsman

Marketing luxury is a game of desire and aspiration told through inventive stories. How do we get our Scottish selves into that mind-set? Appeal to our sense of adventure, sensitivity and imagination. Desire, and what is aspirational today is changing, as our world and environment necessitates. The fast, exploitative, rare, and controlled is thankfully now seen as excessive, wasteful and singularly offensive.  Luckily for Scots, pure slow provenance, balance and connection are our basic luxuries and what the world desires.

 B+W Slow luxury

Enter Slow Luxury. 2014 is a BIG year for Scotland on the world stage.  We will host the Ryder Cup, Commonwealth Games, and the ‘Year of Homecoming’.  The world’s media will be trained on us, it has already started, and this is an unprecedented opportunity to share with the world our old/new essential paradigms…and in the process, raise our luxury profile.

There is much support for the development of Scottish luxury from within Government and industry bodies.  Only this week, James Sugden, Director at cashmere weaver Johnstons of Elgin, said the ‘tide has turned’ for the Scottish textiles industry and ‘the time is now’ for the Scottish Government to support investment in a textiles centre of excellence, as retailers are ‘re-shoring’ their orders from Far East suppliers to our own in Scotland. It is interesting however, that focus is predominantly aimed at innovation and production, with little evident discourse about connecting our brand identities and marketing development to that very innovation by developing new products with an ‘old soul’.   In any event, following closely behind must be development of capacity and capability within companies, to engage a workforce in cultural change and a refreshed common goal that is centred around developing identity, selling the story and delivering world-class service.

Ryder Cup 2014

Ryder Cup 2014

How does Scotland further develop its own brand of luxury culture?  This idea of Slow Luxury includes both accessing our vulnerability and ‘daring greatly’, a philosophy coined and described by US researcher and storyteller, Brene Brown that has achieved global recognition.  What is the vulnerable, the daring we all aspire to?  What are the strengths of our stories and connections with our past? The world today is loudly social, mobile and imminently promoting itself in a collaborative, connected way. Strength in messaging, in collaboration and its ultimate success will depend on the extent to which Scottish luxury companies can envisage their marketing activities solidly taking place in a new paradigm.  We can’t compete with the multi-million pound budgets of our global luxury brand cousins but there may be a better way to reflect our excellence.

How to create a compelling brand story today to expand profits tomorrow? Scotland is a perfect case study to illustrate how the concept of Slow Luxury can be a lens applied to brands and product offerings, to offer luxury consumers specific compelling reasons to purchase now.  In the presentation below, we  roadmap the steps smart brands can take to target more desire for their products and services through this proven new thought leadership, shaping the marketing of the best luxury brands today.

Slow Luxury in New York City

CONVERSATION, FASHION, PEOPLE

New York City, a world fashion industry capital, will be abuzz with Slow Luxury this week!

New York welcomes Slow Luxury co-founder, Fiona Fraser, with glowing media praise for her sustainable brand, Fraser Balgowan. Jade Dressler, Slow Luxury co-founder and fans of Slow Luxury will celebrate the recent Fraser Balgowan media coverage including the brand’s lead opening of the full page article on Scottish heritage in Wall Street Journal, coverage of The Fraser Balgowan Experience at the Michelin-starred Gleneagles Resort on about.com and a stellar review of the collection in Forbes. 

Fashion tastemaker, NY Times and Huffington Post’s Stylist writer, Cator Sparks, recently returned from visiting the Frasers’ in the Scottish Highlands, addressed the issues of sustainability bluntly to the fashion industry via his article in Huffington Post’s Stylist… “I look forward to running around town and country this winter with my new deer hide bag knowing exactly where it came from, the process it took to get it to its present state and the fact that that beautiful stag lived a serene life way up in the foggy, chilly, windy and romantic Scottish Highlands. That’s certainly more than I can guarantee for my Hermès leather belt. The game changer has arrived.”

Here’s where Slow Luxury will be in New York, September 17-26, 2012.

Sept. 20-22        Saks Fifth Avenue Lux event, NYC, 6th floor

                            1 pm to 7 pm

Join us and meet Fiona Fraser, Visionary Slow Luxury Designer
Scotland’s Newest Bespoke Luxury Brand for Fall 2012
 
Join us for Scotch and Soda
Meet NY Times Stylist.com, writer, Tastemaker, Cator Sparks
recently returned from the Fraser Estates
September 21
5 pm to 7 pm

Fiona Fraser, designer and her husband, Ewan Fraser,
3rd-generation Highlands deerstalker present
Fraser Balgowan, new sustainable luxury.
Classic, useful pieces, sustainably-stewarded and sourced
from private estate lands, crafted from century-old techniques and time-tested by Highlanders direct from the wild, natural beauty of the
Scottish Highlands.
For characteristic individuals attuned to the land and tradition,
and the sustainability of our shared global future, Fraser Balgowan offers:
  • limited and bespoke editions
  • made-to-order
  • deer hides, sporting tweeds and bridle leathers
  • personal accessories to travel bags
Saks Fifth Avenue, New York, 611 Fifth Avenue, 6th floor
for more information
Jade Dressler
info@jadedressler
917.991.8140

Sept. 19

Private cocktail party hosted by David Beahm, celebrity and destination wedding event planner, for the city’s top event planners.

Sept. 25

United Nation’s Fashion 4 Development luncheon at the Pierre, along with Saks Fifth Avenue’s head of Luxury, Justin MacInerney; Michele Barbone of Rodale E-commerce; John Favreau, luxury consultant; Edelman PR’s Katarina Wong, Director of Community & Curatorial Engagement and Huffington Post, Africa Style Daily, writer Zandile Blay at the invitation of Slow Luxury co-founder, Jade Dressler and Kristen Paladino of sponsor, LEGEND. Photographs, F4D chair Evie Evangelou and Shirley Madhere, of the UN’s Beauty 4 Empowerment.

F4D, Fashion 4 Development has been making its own contribution to the achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals through awareness-raising campaigns, partnerships, scholarships, fund-raising and the financing of initiatives to grow sustainable economies in developing countries. Additionally, F4D is committed to and supports the UN Secretary-General’s Campaign “Every Woman, Every Child” whose mission is to save the lives of 16 million women from preventable causes of death by 2015.

Evie Evangelou is the visionary who took supermodel Bibi Russell’s project with the United Nations, Fashion 4 Development, and ran with it. Slow Luxury is thrilled to be part of this vehicle for change. Evie is Global Chair along with Vogue Italia editor-in-chief Franca Sozzani, the group’s Goodwill Ambassador; Karen Giberson, President of The Accessories CouncilFern Mallis and many other fashion industry luminaries.

 

Slow Luxury Round Table: Scotland

CONVERSATION

Destination 1: Scotland.

A country with over 3000 years of
Slow Luxury.

Wool, tweeds, cashmere, tartan, paisley, jute, deer hide, leatherwork, bespoke silverware to name but a few materials Scotland excels in. 

The lushness of the land begins the conversation of honor and appreciation, a slow luxury approach to crafting materials into goods.

“In Scotland, you see that luxury can also be coarse, dry, and hard. What’s interesting is that the younger generation understands that.” related Eric Jennings, Saks Fifth Avenue’s men’s fashion director, in a Wall Street Journal article featuring Scotland’s newest luxury brand at the forefront of Slow Luxury, Fraser Balgowan, and the current passion for Scottish luxury.

Textiles Scotland works with the textiles industry in Scotland to promote the best design, innovation and quality and has been working closely with Fraser Balgowan. Together with Gleneagles Resort in Perthshire, Scotland, we hosted the first Slow Luxury Round Table on August 16, 2012.

International journalists and guests gathered for a round table cocktail showcase and conversation with Scotland’s most legendary, treasured and new luxury brands, such as Hawick Cashmere, Begg Cashmere, Eribe and Johnstons of Elgin. The presentation was moderated by luxury brand consultant and Slow Luxury co-founder, Jade Dressler. Stewart Roxburgh, senior executive at Scottish Enterprise and visionary advocate for Scotland’s textile industry, also presented and sees the many possibilities to bring Scotland’s best to a global audience.

Luxury and travel experts in attendance included writer Laurie Kahle, of Atelier magazine, who covered the event and The Fraser Balgowan Experience at Gleneagles for Forbes; writer Clint Brownfield for About.com/Honeymoons and celebrity and destination wedding event planner, David Beahm.

Legendary silversmith, Hamilton & Inches, displayed their exquisite work during  bespoke design sessions and consultations between Slow Luxury co-founder and designer of Fraser Balgowan, Fiona Fraser and prominent journalists and tastemakers. The tastemakers included New York writer Cator Sparks, here modeling a spectacular sporran made by Hamilton & Inches, Read more about that event, Cator’s adventure and appreciation of Slow Luxury in Huffington Post’s Stylelist and an interview with Cator, here.